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Monday, October 10, 2011

0 WHAT IS A 'G-SPOT' ?




 A G-spot is a patch of erectile tissue/sponge that can be felt through the front wall of the vagina - an area which when stimulated can lead to high levels of sexual arousal and powerful orgasms. It was named after German gynecologist named Ernst Gräfenberg.

"For much of the past millennium, great explorers such as Sir John Franklin and John Cabot searched for the elusive, mysterious North-West Passage linking the Pacific and Atlantic oceans.
Man's search for women's Gspot has been much the same. It has continued for generations and has almost always ended in disaster and emotional frostbite." - Dailymail sketchwriter Quentin Letts




The term "G-Spot" was coined by Addiego et al. in 1981, after the German gynecologist Ernst Gräfenberg, even though his 1940s research was dedicated to urethral stimulation and not internal vaginal wall stimulation. The concept entered popular culture after the publication of The G Spot and Other Recent Discoveries About Human Sexuality by Ladas et al. in 1982, but it was criticized immediately by leading gynecologists. They denied its existence as it is not easily found if not aroused and autopsy studies missed this. After the G-Spot was demonstrated for their observation they changed their minds. It turns out that stimulation of the G-spot produces a very powerful kind of female orgasm; and in some women, it even produces female ejaculation, colloquially known as "squirting." 

An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to 2350 professional women in the United States and Canada with a subsequent 55% return rate. Of these respondents, 40% reported having a fluid release (ejaculation) at the moment of orgasm. Further, 82% of the women who reported the sensitive area (Gräfenberg Spot) also reported ejaculation with their orgasms. A number of variables were associated with this perceived existence of female ejaculation.

While not disputing vaginal responsiveness to stimulation, gynecologists and doctors continue to be skeptical of the existence of a distinct anatomical feature in the G-Spot rub zone.


The Gräfenberg Spot, is a bean-shaped area of the vagina. Many women report that it is an erogenous zone which, when stimulated, can lead to strong sexual arousal, powerful orgasms and female ejaculation. The Gräfenberg Spot is typically located one to three inches (2.5 to 7.6 cm) up the front (anterior) vaginal wall between the vaginal opening and the urethra and is a sensitive area that may be part of the female prostate.

Although the G-Spot has been studied since the 1940s, disagreement persists over its existence as a distinct structure, definition and location. A 2009 British study concluded that its existence is unproven and subjective, based on questionnaires and personal experience. It is also hypothesized that the G-Spot is an extension of the clitoris and that this is the cause of vaginal orgasms. Other studies, using ultrasound, have found physiological evidence of the G-Spot in women who report having orgasms during intercourse.


At the same time, the G-spot is commonly derided as perpetuating the myth ensconced by Sigmund Freud -- namely, that the clitoral orgasm is a "lesser" form of climax than the vaginal orgasm, which requires penile penetration. As Ian Kerner summarizes, "In Freud's view, there were no two ways about it: If a woman couldn't be satisfied by penetrative sex, something must be wrong with her."
The G-spot's existence is still debated, and whether it's fact or fiction depends on whom you ask:

"The G-spot exists," says Seth Prosterman. "It's a source of powerful orgasm for a percentage of women."

"I don't think the G-spot exists," says Ira Sharlip. "As urologists, we operate in that area [where the G-spot should be] and there just isn't anything there -- there's no anatomical structure that's there."
Prosterman and others point out the importance of thinking of the G-spot in context -- that it may be an extension of the clitoral anatomy, which extends back into the vaginal canal. Kerner writes that the G-spot may be "nothing more than the roots of the clitoris crisscrossing the urethral sponge."
Helen O'Connell, MD, head of the neurourology and continence unit at the Royal Melbourne Hospital Department of Urology in Australia, says, "The G-spot has a lot in common with Freud's idea of vaginal orgasms. It is a sexual concept, this time anatomical, that results in confusion and has resulted in the misconception that female sexuality is extremely complex."


Locating the G-spot
The G-spot location is different for each woman and is easiest to locate when a woman is sexually aroused - so don't skip the foreplay!  It has been said the best way to find the G-spot is with the finger(s) instead of the penis.

To locate and master the woman's G-spot, face your partner while she is lying on her back and insert your index or long middle finger into her vagina as far as it will easily go. Then bend it up toward yourself in a "come hither" motion, sliding your fingertip along the top of the vagina until you find an area that is rougher than the rest of that vaginal wall. (Make sure you have your fingernails clipped short and buffed before you do this -- sharp fingernails will definitely spoil the effort.) This rough or slightly ridged area is the "G-spot," and touching it will often cause a woman to react with surprise or pleasure.


Video


 
In the end, whether this debated locus of pleasure is fact or fiction may not matter that much. O'Connell, who is also co-author of a 2005 Journal of Urology study on the anatomy of the clitoris, says that focusing on the G-spot to the exclusion of the rest of a woman's body is "a bit like stimulating a guy's testicles without touching the penis and expecting an orgasm to occur just because love is present." She says focusing on the inside of the vagina to the exclusion of the clitoris is "unlikely to bring about orgasm. It is best to think of the clitoris, urethra, and vagina as one unit because they are intimately related."

Sexual psychologists are concerned that women may consider themselves to be dysfunctional if they cannot find their G-Spot. Women have undergone a plastic surgery procedure called G-Spot amplification to enhance its sensitivity.


So, what about you?  Do you have a G-spot and if so.. where is it located?  Don't be shy. Let us know so we can solve this dilemna once and for all!





Source(s):  wikipedia, ca.askmen.com, webmd.com

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